Friday, April 29, 2022

Virtual Book Tour and Giveaway: Witchslayer's Scion by L.T. Getty

Welcome to my stop on the virtual book tour for Witchslayer's Scion by L.T. Getty. This book tour was organized by Goddess Fish Promotions. On my stop, I have an excerpt from the book as well as a highly interesting guest post from the author. There's also the tour wide giveaway for a chance to win a $25 gift card to a book seller of the winner's choice. Be sure to visit the other stops on the tour for more content. Enjoy!
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Title: Witchslayer's Scion
Author: L.T. Getty
Publication Date: June 21st 2021
Print Length: 357 pages
Genre: Epic Fantasy
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Koth’s life was decided for him since before he was born, for his ability to heal wounds by touch is rare even among his people. When an attempted kidnapping turns to sacrificial murder, he embraces vengeance and the sword. As he journeys far from his small isolated village in the north, he learns the truth as to why his bloodline is targeted by strange magic, in a world still rebuilding from a time when dark sorcerers didn’t bother with secrecy.

Koth thinks his quest is straightforward enough--find the men responsible, and kill them--and any who aid them. He will soon learn that those who have both privilege and power, there are few things they lack--and in the pursuit of godhood, their allies can prove even more sinister as mere mortals seek to advent empires and dynasties.

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EXCERPT:
“Something’s wrong,” Una said. “Koth, wait here.”

“Why?” If there was a problem, she should be waiting outside for him.

He sensed inside, his aunt’s thoughts remained hidden from him. Una shouted, and he ran inside the building. He thought there were lights on inside, but he saw no candles.

The tea house was very dark, and he felt a sudden dread—he wanted to leave. Baro barked from the outside. ~Una!~ he thought, before something hit his neck.

He knew at once it was a poison dart, and ripping it out he tried to smell what it was. Seeing metal reflect moonlight and he moved his hand, his skin cut. Moving instinctively out of the way, his next reaction was to purge the toxin that coursed through his body and tried to understand the wound. It was mostly his forearm, deep but he could still use it, the bone unaffected. He’d do a better healing later. He focused on something not unlike a burn before going for the knife at his hip. Striking 85 in the next liquid motion, Koth realized he was attacking his aunt.

She grabbed onto his injured flesh and seared it, destroying, weakening the sinew and the cartilage and causing it to age and die, following up the bloodstream, to find the heart and kill. Koth tried to brace; he couldn’t heal and keep her at bay. He was physically stronger and much heavier, but she was weakening his muscles. He tried to wrench the knife from her.

He knocked the blade to the ground then tried to lock minds with her to find nothing short of blinding pain take him over, wrestling him to the ground and making him drop his knife. She took the dagger and when he tried to force himself up, a familiar sense washed over him. Magic, but not coming from Una.

“Do not kill him yet,” Yeshbel said, “we will bleed him first.”
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
L.T. Getty is a rural paramedic from Manitoba. She enjoys writing science fiction and fantasy and generally being creative.




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GUEST POST:
- What is your favourite element to write about in the fantasy genre?

Whether it’s our world with a tweak and hints of what’s lurking behind the masquerade, or we’re dealing with something that could only exist in a dream, I love the feeling of knowing I’m in a fantasy story.

World-building is not unique to fantasy. Whether we’re talking about bringing history to life, or the imagined worlds of science fiction, virtually all stories care about their setting.

In order to make it a fantasy story, and not just a fantasy setting, is to consider how is the plot only possible because of the elements that make the story a fantasy? What that means, ultimately, is that the plot is only possible because of the fantastic. That doesn’t mean that these elements have to be at the forefront (explicitly high fantasy) or that we couldn’t change setting (we could bring the plot from a dark age to a more modern or even future one).

It doesn’t have to be magic. Bending based on the classical four elements, expressed in Avatar: The Last Airbender, is not magic, but for the sake of our discussion, close enough. Remove bending, and we still have an epic cast and a story about conquest, but it becomes thematically different without bending, even if we were to replace the elemental origins with other powers.

Remove The One Ring from the story of The Lord of the Rings, so much would have to change, I don’t think it could be told. I’m trying to think of the plot behind Wheel of Time if I were to remove Channelling or The Dragon Reborn, and I can’t do it. The conflict for the crown in A Song of Ice and Fire is based on The War of the Roses, but if you look at the series as a whole, it’s the fantastic elements – the ice zombies threatening the whole of the continent and the re-emergence of dragons into the world, that make the story a fantasy as opposed to a reimagining of feudal England. Geralt of Rivia of The Witcher is basically a professional exterminator of the magical variety, but his story hinges around how he is an outcast for doing what needs to be done. He’s not hunting wolves to which he could be lauded, he’s viewed as a freak but the locals need him to deal with their nuisances of a supernatural variety.

Fantasy as a genre allows us to look at how life would be different with these supernatural forces, even if they’re normalized and magic is a common thing, at least in certain parts of the world. How would wizards travel if they could magically transport from place to place? How would cultures get along if some people are nigh immortal? Would gnomes get reduced transport fees on the train, given that they take up less space and generally eat less? Would magic make certain occupations obsolete? Now before we get imagining how wonderful it would be, take it dark. How do you deal with criminals who can’t be held in conventional prisons? If only certain people can control magic, are there systems in place to keep them in check or, do they rule over others who don’t have access to power? Are people born with powers expected to fulfill certain roles and responsibilities in their communities, and what happens if they don’t?

For me the best part is that I can pick up novel after novel that uses a mythical creature that almost everyone would know – and find drastically different interpretations.

If I use the word dragon, it doesn’t matter what culture you come from, most people can quickly conjure up an image. Whether it’s a malevolent fire drake from a western tradition, or the wiser, more serpentine benevolent beings of many eastern traditions, dragons and other mythical creatures exist in a sort of unspoken cultural collective. Authors could reimagine the dragon from the story of Saint George and the Dragon as the monster being a dinosaur, or give their own spin on what is a dragon; giving them the ability to speak or shapeshift. So long as the author is consistent and aren’t flying in the face of what the readers expects what a dragon could be, and how their presence effects the world, we may ask questions or grumble, but we’ll know that was an interpretation of a dragon. In other words, I can leap from novel to novel that all contain drastically different dragons, and at an unconscious level, so long as the author ticks enough boxes, most audiences will suspend their belief and accept dragons having drastically different attributes from tale to tale.

Fantasy as a genre is too expansive to neatly wrap up in an article like this. So many tales of wonder that feel like they could never take place here, but somewhere like here. Only like a dream, or some place we wish we could visit, but know we can’t because these multiple interpretations can’t all exist. Like a story you sort of remember from childhood, and you wish you could remember. Part of you knowing if you ever did find it, maybe you’d be afraid to see it with adult eyes. It’s that place, I think, that fantasy can have you bridging the gap between our oldest mythologies and our constant retellings of stories you sort of already know, and with new tales being woven with interpretations in ways you never thought of before.

I’m not saying you need to like every reimagining. Some are going to be better than others and, sometimes the best interpretations of folklore are interpretations where there are no fantastic elements, such as in the 90’s film Ever After: A Cinderella Story. For me, what is important is that ultimately the meat of these stories reach across trends and even culture, and introducing fantastic elements allows us to highlight something that speaks to us across generations. I think it’s important to remember old stories, they can teach us lessons that have stood the test of time, especially in a culture that wants to believe it’s in an era of post-truth.
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GIVEAWAY:
L.T. Getty will be awarding a $25 gift card to an online bookseller of the winner's choice to a randomly drawn person via Rafflecopter. Good luck!

(All the Ups and Downs is not responsible for this giveaway, its entries, or the prize. Goddess Fish Promotions and the author assume all responsibility over this giveaway.)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

72 comments:

  1. Sounds like an interesting book.

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  2. Sounds fantastic! Great cover.

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  3. Very nice cover. I enjoyed the excerpt. sounds like a terrific fantasy read

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  4. great cover, this sounds like an exciting read

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  5. Sounds like an exciting story.

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  6. Happy Friday! Do you have any reading or writing plans for the weekend, L.T.?

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  7. Great guest post and excerpt, Witchslayer's Scion sounds like an excellent read for me! Thanks for sharing it with me and have a fantastic TGIF!

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  8. David HollingsworthApril 29, 2022 at 8:25 PM

    Happy Friday!

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  9. It sounds like an interesting book. Thank you for sharing.

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  10. I like everything about this book - genre title and cover!
    Thank you for sharing this with us.

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  11. Sounds fascinating!

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  12. This sounds like an interesting book and I also like the cover.

    abfantom at yahoo dot com

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  13. David HollingsworthApril 30, 2022 at 5:38 PM

    This book sounds great.

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  14. “The art of writing is the art of discovering what you believe.” – Gustav Flaubert

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  15. The excerpt is interesting. Thank you for sharing it.

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  16. “I know nothing in the world that has as much power as a word. Sometimes I write one, and look at it, until it shines.” – Emily Dickinson

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  17. Witchslayer's Scion by author L.T. Getty sounds like a book that readers of Epic Fantasy would really enjoy.

    Nancy
    allibrary (at) aol (dot) com

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  18. Do you have any advice for new writers?

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  19. What is a small annoyance you deal with daily?

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  20. Your book sounds like something I would really love to read.

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  21. What's your favourite country song?

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  22. When did you discover you have the gift of writing?

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  23. “Imagination is the beginning of creation. You imagine what you desire, you will what you imagine and at last you create what you will.” – George Bernard Shaw

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  24. May the fourth be with you!

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  25. What are your plans for this summer?

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  26. Do you still have any friends from high school?

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  27. Luv finding new interesting books / authors, Thank you

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  28. Do you have a secret addiction?

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  29. Looks like its going to be a interesting book.

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  30. This cover looks good and something my 15 year old son wouldn't mind reading. Looks like an entertaining book to read.

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  31. Where do you get your ideas for writing?

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  32. What was your favourite vacation?

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  33. I hope you had a great day!

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  34. How long does it usually take you to write an entire book?

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  35. Do you reward yourself with something special when finishing a book?

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  36. Did you get a lot of encouragement when you decided to become an author?

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  37. Where do you like to shop the most?

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  38. Have you ever started a book that you decided not to finish?

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  39. Most positive thing about writing and most negative thing about writing -- what are they?

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  40. Thank you for a chance to win!

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  41. Is it fun to use your creativity to write a fantasy book of this type?

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  42. Sounds like a good book. I like the cover and excerpt.

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  43. Sounds like a great book. I'm looking forward to reading it.

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  44. What is your favorite place to do your writing?

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  45. How do you "flesh out" your characters?

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  46. Any real life inspiration?

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