Thursday, June 17, 2021

NBtM Book Tour and Giveaway: Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable by Susanne M. Dutton

Welcome to my stop on the NBtM book tour for Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable by Susanne M. Dutton. This book tour was organized by Goddess Fish Promotions. On my stop, I have an excerpt from the book as well as fascinating guest post. There's also the tour wide giveaway for a chance to win a $50 Amazon or Barnes & Noble gift card. Be sure to visit the other stops along the tour for more content. Enjoy!
--
Title: Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable
Author: Susanne M. Dutton
Publisher: Propertius Press
Publication Date: June 1st 2021
Genre: Mystery
~
The game is not afoot. The Better-Every-Day world of 1895 is gone, even hard to recall as WWI ends. From his rural cottage, Holmes no longer provokes Scotland Yard’s envy or his landlady’s impatience, but neither is he content with the study of bees. 

August 1920 finds him filling out entry papers at a nearly defunct psychiatric clinic on the Normandy coast. England’s new Dangerous Drugs Act declares his cocaine use illegal and he aims to quit entirely.

Confronted by a question as to his “treatment goal,” Holmes hesitates, aware that his real goal far exceeds the capacity of any clinic. His scribbled response, “no more solutions, but one true resolution,” seems more a vow than a goal to his psychiatrist, Pierre Joubert. The doctor is right. Like a tiny explosion unaccountably shifting a far-reaching landscape, the simple words churn desperate action and interlocking mystery into the lives of Holmes’ friends and enemies both.

---
EXCERPT:
Watson speaks:

“For God’s sake, then, I must be the one to venture out to him! I know Holmes like no one else. He will not be surprised, or at least not angered, to see me here. He will be relieved. You must trust me on this.”

Joubert’s shook his head. “That was my plan. Just so, mon ami. That is exactly what I believed, and why I sent for you, John. But my speculation did not extend to this.” He gestured toward the windows. The only remaining piece of window glass, a shard big enough to slice off a foot, fell and shattered on the brick floor. I granted myself a sideways glance at Joubert as we both put our chins down and covered our heads again.

An uneasy suspicion took root in my mind, only a seed at first, but an idea that sprouted quickly. If Holmes was angry with this Joubert, then Holmes had reason to be. The detective, as I knew him, was disinclined to speak of his family. It was not impossible that a sister existed or had existed, though I had not seen one in the genealogy upstairs.

Further, how was I to know that the man next to me in the dark was truly the Pierre Joubert of high repute? Even if Holmes had returned to the cocaine, hadn’t I better treat this fellow’s explanations with wariness? Holmes’ addiction had never before affected his ability to adjudge good and evil. Unerringly, Sherlock Holmes recognized the enemy of the just.
---
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Susanne Dutton is the one who hid during high school gym, produced an alternative newspaper and exchanged notes in Tolkien’s Elfish language with her few friends. While earning her B.A. in English, she drove a shabby Ford Falcon with a changing array of homemade bumper strips: Art for Art’s Sake, Forgive Us Our Trespasses, Free Bosie from the Scorn of History. Later, her interests in myth and depth psychology led to graduate and postgraduate degrees in counseling.

Nowadays, having outlived her mortgage and her professional counseling life, she aims herself at her desk most days; where she tangles with whatever story she can’t get out of her head. Those stories tend to seat readers within pinching distance of her characters, who, like most of us, slide at times from real life to fantasy and back. A man with Alzheimer’s sets out alone for his childhood home. A girl realizes she’s happier throwing away her meals than eating them. A woman burgles her neighbors in order to stay in the neighborhood.

Born in Des Moines, Iowa, Susanne grew up in the SF Bay Area, has two grown children, and lives with her husband in an old Philadelphia house, built of the stones dug from the ground where it sits.

---
GUEST POST:
The Second Most Famous Address:
Quirky Hidden Holmes History I Stumbled Over in Research for 
“Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable.”
by Susanne M. Dutton

“What’s the most famous address in the world?” she asked—and retreated to the other side of the room as the dispute erupted. “Surely, we speak of the western world;” someone tried to add, without success. Then a less dangerous question was put forth. “What’s the most famous fictional address in the world? Or at least the western world?” When a stranger insisted on the North Pole, subdued nods followed, but I maintained that next up must be 221B Baker Street, with other challengers far behind. In the mid 19th C, the neighborhood earned the term “genteel,” in John Fisher Murray’s designations for old London neighborhoods. Not exclusive, in other words, or fashionable. Picture shops, pubs, and “mansion blocks,” i.e. multi-dwelling buildings, crowded its streets, not palaces or museums.

Soon after Holmes and Watson took rooms together, or decided to “share a suite,” the public’s hunt for 221B Baker Street commenced. Unfortunately, no such address existed in that year, when the numbers stopped at 84.

Questions were raised. Answers flooded in. What if the doctor and detective actually lived in York Place, more recently a part of Baker Street? No doubt Watson, whom we’ve blithely trusted on this, simply wanted to protect his own home from the sort of risks notoriety brings. Regents Park, the end of present day Baker Street might do, though the numbers system fails again, going only so far as 54.

Life finally caught up with art after the final original Holmes story was published in 1930. Baker Street was extended and renumbered. An entire city block became 219 to 229 Baker Street—as well as the headquarters of the Abbey Road Building Society, and then in 1989, the Abbey National Bank. Meanwhile, so many letters arrived pleading for Holmes’ help that the bank made answering them a priority and part of someone’s job description. I have to hope this person wasn’t expected to actually chase down bad guys. In any case, confusion about the coveted addressed continued when the Sherlock Holmes Museum set up in 1990 at 239 Baker Street, a more appropriate-looking address. To settle the matter, the museum petitioned to get their address changed to 221B. Permission was flatly refused in 1994. In a wily move, the museum simply registered as a business, legally called 221B Limited, and inscribed the name over the door. So there.

The bank moved away from Baker Street in 2002, retiring in good grace when they installed a fine statue of Sherlock Holmes at nearby Baker Street Tube Station.
---
GIVEAWAY:
Susanne M. Dutton will be awarding a $50 Amazon or Barnes & Noble gift card to one randomly chosen winner via Rafflecopter. Good luck!
a Rafflecopter giveaway

221 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I'm glad All The Ups and Downs decided to publish this guest post--and the photos, too! Susanne M. Dutton

      Delete
  2. The title really draws me in, a must on my TBR list. Beat of luck with the tour.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Michele.Sorry about the deletion previous. "Attie Straight" was the name of a character in another book, a name I used sometimes for anonymous entries. The Remaining Improbable is the best title. It's a little hard to say, but when Holmes comes to what's remaining in his life, this story tells that mystery.

      Delete
  3. Congratulations on the book release. Sounds like a wonderful book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Peg42! Finding a publisher like Propertius Press and working with them to the finished book was wonderful. The creme on the cake is the release. Susanne M. Dutton

      Delete
  4. Sounds very interesting, this one will keep you guessing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Leonie. Nothing so true was ever said about this book. There are several mysteries, but the big one is a toughie. Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  5. I liked the excerpt, thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Rita. I'm glad someone chose to use that excerpt: Holmes' doctor and his colleague, trying to figure out what the detective can possibly be doing.... Susanne M. Dutton

      Delete
  6. Replies
    1. Thank you. You must be the one the crowd goes to for book tips! Susanne M. Dutton

      Delete
  7. I enjoyed the excerpt. Thank you for the giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Debbi! Thank you for participating and for reading the excerpt. Susanne M. Dutton

      Delete
  8. This sounds like a very good book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Sherry. Thank you for participating. I tried answering your comment earlier, but it didn't stick. I do appreciate your comment. Susanne

      Delete
  9. Sounds like an interesting read. Thanks for the giveaway.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Elizabeth! I once had a boss who used the word "interesting" about things that the rest of the staff found stomach-turning... I think you mean something else, but I always think of that. My book does have some hair raising moments, but I hope it's interesting in the way that will hold a reader's attention. Thank you for participating. Susanne

      Delete
  10. I love a great mystery. Good work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Paige. I love mysteries, too. I must have read hundreds, maybe a thousand? (I'm pretty old.) Thank you for participating. Susanne Dutton

      Delete
  11. congrats on the book this sounds awesome

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Wendy. I aimed at the Holmes we all know and love, but confronted with the kind of challenge that he'd never faced. Thank you for participating. Susanne M. Dutton

      Delete
  12. It sounds like a very detailed book. I'm sure it would be great to read.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jen. You're right. I think details bring stories to life, especially if related to our five senses. The more outrageous the fiction, the more important. Thank you for participating!

      Delete
  13. congrats on the book it looks so amazing keep up the great work and thank you for a chance to win :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Zelda! I've met a Zelda who runs great writing workshops, as well as being a great writer. Are you her? Of course, there could be TWO of you! Anyway, thank you for the compliments and your participation. Susanne

      Delete
  14. Sounds like a great book. I like the cover and the excerpt.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Susan. I was called Susan all the way through grade school because my parents spelled Susanne with an "s." I don't believe it's as common a name as it once was, but it'll come around again. I have Propertius Press to thank for the cover. I only gave them a google image of an old clock as a basic idea. I'm glad All Ups and Downs chose that excerpt, too: Holmes' doctor and his colleague Watson, under intense pressure! Susanne

      Delete
  15. nice book cover and the book sounds interesting. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Deb. The book took me to unexpected places, but I'm what's called a "pantser." I work first of all from an image. Strangely, I understand Stephen King does so, also. He has an image of a boy flying a kite on a beach....then it moves and someone says something. No-way-out situations follow, so I wait some more and then I do brainstorm and explore solutions, but those are only intriguing openings along the way, not real problems. I know what the book will say in the end, but not exactly how it will be said. The cover was the work of Steph and the graphics team at Propertius Press. I like it, too. Susanne

      Delete
  16. It's nice to see your book tour. Best wishes. Sherlock is awesome.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Calvin. I'm enjoying it. It' interesting to see the other books out there right now. Susanne

      Delete
  17. How long was the writing process?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This was three years in the writing, Deborah. I did finish a couple other short stories during that time, as well. Thank you for participating. Susanne

      Delete
  18. Replies
    1. Sure. The chance of winning is always fun to have at the back of your mind. It's not a grand prize, but I think it's a good thing to have going on at the same time. Susanne (Attie Straight is a name I use on Google, taken from another book. Sorry for the confusion.)

      Delete
  19. I line any book with references to Scotland Yard. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me, too. I particularly enjoy the non-fiction Yard films now available. Holmes is no joiner, but he'd appreciate the Yard today. Susanne

      Delete
  20. The excerpt is interesting. Thank you for sharing it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. It's a tough thing to choose excerpt that don't give the "Game" away, as Holmes would say. Susanne

      Delete
  21. Love any thing to do with Sherlock Holmes, nice angle of reuniting Sherlock and John.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Kimberly. Yes. I thought making sure something different happened between our colleagues was important. Thank you for participating. Susanne

      Delete
  22. What an interesting angle to Sherlock Holmes which brings him more down-to-earth with flaws. This looks like a good read with a backstory that keeps making an appearance throughout the story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow! I think I could use your words for one of those "elevator pitches" I'm supposed to be able to produce. Thank you. Yes. Not only does Holmes show some flaws, but he also shows that as he has aged, he has grown wilier, smarter, and wiser than ever. I always wondered why the the Conan Doyle stories didn't exhibit very clearly how Holmes was "the best and wisest" man John Watson has ever known. Susanne

      Delete
  23. Replies
    1. It's certainly a Holmes mystery with all the classic Holmes weirdness, but with a different kick-in-the-pants for good measure. Susanne

      Delete
  24. About how long does it take you to write a book?
    Suppose it varies?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Barbara! This one was about three years, but I was busy actually moving twice during that time and also writing and publishing two long short stories. It does vary. This required lots of research.

      Delete
  25. I always enjoy learning about authors and books that are new to me!

    Nancy
    allibrary (at) aol (dot) com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Nancy. This is my first Holmes book, but I'm working on another. I like to write about basically good people confronted by circumstances they had not expected. A man with dementia who realizes he wants to take a bus to his childhood home, a girl who realizes she feels like throwing her meals away rather than eating them, a woman who begins to steal small things from her neighbors and selling them on ebay (in order to be able to stay in the neighborhood.) Although my Holmes book shows the reader the classic Holmes, he is confronted by circumstances he had not expected. That's life, after all. Susanne

      Delete
  26. This sounds like an interesting read!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jenn. The book does have its intense scenes and the excerpt here is one of them, but "Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable" has some comedy, too. Susanne

      Delete
  27. Where is your favorite place to write?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Slehan. Thanks for that question. Picture a room that was used as a roomy closet by the last people who owned this 1925 house. There are two windows. I can imagine it was also once a nursery. Hardwood floors with light brown vertical striped wallpaper make it nest-like, even in this last frigid winter. My desk is something I bought new in about 1990, once white-painted, and now turned to an ivory color. My chair is an upholstered slipper chair that supports my back and keeps my feet flat. I am using a ten year old MAC that is slow--but it keeps coming to life in the mornings, so I keep it. Susanne

      Delete
  28. Hello Leela. Thank you for participating. I'd say the story is the classic Holmes we all love, but the underlying motivations are unique, and told with a sense of humor. In my humble opinion, of course. What other opinion can I give you? Anyway, thank you! Susanne

    ReplyDelete
  29. Thank you! The book is available on Amazon now, in paperback and ebook of whatever kind you need. Best wishes. Susanne

    ReplyDelete
  30. Do you have any advice for new writers?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jamie. You've heard of the advice about real estate? Location, location, location. For writers, it's read, read, read. If you can read something more challenging, then that's better. I ended up loving Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) and having a sketch of the old guy on my wall. More challenging than Dickens or Conan Doyle or Jane Austen, way less than Tolstoy. Someone like Stephen King, who is a great writer, is doing something else. I still think Trollope is more worth reading. He changed me. What did I know about him? Not much. Now I know his work sinks deep into the stories, deep into the lives of the characters and the cultures in which they live. Even when his situations seem foreign to me, the humanity he portrays is real. The fact that the characters and the culture are very removed from me is fine. He "informed" my writing, though I'd never think I could touch by miles what he accomplished. The other thing is to notice the state into which your writing transports you. If you get into the zone, where time passes as you take on the characters and their lives, then that makes writing a real magnetic draw, makes it a hard place to get to sometimes, but a wonderful, easy place to stay. I appreciate your question. I love to talk about writing. Thank you! Susanne

      Delete
  31. Where did you go on your favourite vacation?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I actually went to Assisi, Italy, in order to take a course, but certainly it was my favorite travel destination. I would sit in a little chair overlooking lovely hills and old farmhouses with their red tile roofs and think, "Well. I could stay here a long time...." Thank you for participating! Susanne

      Delete
  32. What inspired you to become a writer?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really don't know. I just found myself doing it, a long time ago. I kept a little notebook as a kid, copying poems from the encyclopedia, writing some of my own. In fourth grade I wrote a story about three witch sisters. I still recall the last line: "So they danced witch dances and sang witch songs, all the whole night through." The important part is that my mother asked me if she could type it up for me. Now that's inspiration. Thank you for asking and participating. Susanne

      Delete
    2. Omg that’s amazing. I actually won a writing contest in 3rd grade statewide between all the elementary schools. I always wanted to be a writer, but I just haven’t took the plunge. I read a lot, but writing just doesn’t come to me as easily as it used to. Need to get back that young imagination. Thanks for sharing!

      Delete
    3. Hi Drea! Here I am on vacation and flicking through the 81 comments on this blog site and I saw this just now. I'm sorry I didn't catch it. I was interested in writing by 3rd grade, too, writing little poems and hiding the notebook under my mattress. As you say, the beginning is reading, reading, reading. I never would have written anything back then if I imagined anyone would ever read it. No way! Susanne

      Delete
    4. Lol I always hear writers say that! I get it too! The beginning is like the rough drafts and not your best work. I’ve always wanted to be a writer, but I’m not sure I’ve got the talent.

      Delete
    5. Hi Drea. I guess is a gift, but the gift is not so much an inborn knowledge about writing, it's an inborn or early-born love of reading and words. That means you will write because it's satisfying and not because it's going to be published. After all, you rarely know for sure about the publication.

      Delete
  33. Hello Drea Drake, I love 4th of July and the fireworks, too. I wish it weren't such a big bad day for dogs (or at least the dogs I know." Anyway, Cheers! Susanne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree the poor dogs hate the fireworks and vets they are beautiful but there’s a big down side to them too

      Delete
  34. Love the cover and the excerpt sounds amazing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for participating, Thomas Gibson. Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable actually sold out at Amazon, but is still available at www.propertiuspress.com both as an ebook of any kind and a print book. Susanne

      Delete
  35. Do you write while on vacation?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes. I am part of a very large family, and we meet at a beach in the summer. I lost count of the number, but it's at least six houses full of siblings, cousins, grandchildren and a few friends, too. At the end of the afternoon, I retreat to write (i.e. get some alone time) and I'm refreshed for the evening, unless I'm cooking. The very early morning is good, too, with the advantage of coffee. Thank you for your question. Susanne

      Delete
  36. Hello Drea. It looks like another hot one, but I'll be in my "garden," anyway. I actually think of it as a "yard," but I like the idea that I'll be in the garden. Gardens are the sound of running water, lavender flowers and butterflies. No wasps, please. Actually, if I keep the weeds down, I give myself a nod. Thank you for participating. Susanne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well... some grass with bushes around it. I'm a good pruner, keeping the bushes from invading my neighbors. Thank you for participating! Susanne

      Delete
    2. That actually sounds lovely, I’ve always wanted to start my own garden! The bugs would drive me nuts though!

      Delete
    3. Hi Drea. I didn't start my own garden. I only inherited it from the former owners, but at least I've kept it going. Susanne

      Delete
    4. That’s still a fete in itself! I’d love to have one regardless!

      Delete
    5. It's work, for sure, but it's "grounding." (Ha,ha!)

      Delete
  37. Do you listen to music when you write?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No. I don't try to make things silent, but I prefer the usual sounds of home, which is pretty quiet. These days, the sound of a ceiling fan is perfect! Susanne

      Delete
  38. I love Sherlock Holmes. This book sounds like something I would enjoy reading.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Alecia. I did my best to be true to the original Holmes and Watson characters, but aimed to give them both completely new challenges. I believe I succeeded. Try it!

      Delete
  39. What inspires your book plots?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your question and for participating, Traciem. I start with the characters, not the plot, though in this case, a plot bloomed up in my head while I was visiting a collection of 18th Century French art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. I realized that the artists were the Vernet family of artists whom Arthur Conan Doyle designated as Holmes' ancestors. An invitation for a story!

      Delete
  40. Hi! I am a journalling fool, first thing in the morning. All kinds of images and ideas come from those pages. The Holmes book had another input, however, from an exhibition of French art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Many of the pieces were the work of the Vernets, a 18th century family, who, in the supposed biography of Holmes, were his ancestors. Apparently there was a London exhibit of work by this family in the 1880's, which was noted by Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Holmes. That experience came together with many others to make the plot, which grew and morphed over a three year period. Thank you for a good question! Susanne

    ReplyDelete
  41. There was a post a couple of days ago about how often we can do comments for your giveaways?
    Would you please repeat it?
    I did not understand.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. https://www.facebook.com/alltheupsandowns. Hi Barbara, I saw that too, but I don't see it here now. That was written by the blogger (not me) and I believe her concern was repetitions of the same non-book or author/writer related questions or comments. I did look for a place to ask her about it, however. Her Facebook page link is here and and it has a very prominent MESSAGE button. https://www.facebook.com/alltheupsandowns. Susanne

      Delete
    2. Thanks Susanne =)

      Hi Barbara,
      Another person complained to Goddess Fish about comments being repetitive and not having anything to do with the books and author. This person was very upset because she wasn't winning the giveaways which is why she complained. Anyway, Goddess Fish Promotions wanted me to let people know that comments need to pertain to the actual book and/or author.

      Hope that helps. =)

      Delete
  42. It's the last day of vacation for me and I aim to make it count, though much time will be spent packing up the kitchen that has had to feed seven people for the week, including a one year old. I aim to make it count anyway. Tonight, there's a full moon. Susanne

    ReplyDelete
  43. On vacation, that sounds fun! Where to? Also, if you could go anywhere in the world where would you want to go?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well. It's over now, but I went to a beach in North Carolina, watched a red sun come up and then an orange-red harvest moon 12 hours later.

      Delete
    2. Hi DreaDrake. I'm writing another Holmes adventure now. I need to do research. I'd visit London in 1895, not to stay, mind you, but simply to observe... Susanne

      Delete
    3. That’s awesome I’m in Kentucky and I missed the red sun! Hope you had a great trip. I love Sherlock Holmes & I’d love to visit there too or to that time!

      Delete
    4. If you ever find out a way to do that, let me know. There is Jack Finney's "Time and Time Again," a wonderful time travel novel that features multiple trips to the 19C. It's New York City setting, but you'd might like it. Susanne

      Delete
  44. Do you ever use your own experiences to write a book?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I find it's almost impossible to not to use some of my own experiences, but they may need disguises. You remind me of a question posed to writer Norman Mailer on this subject. A journalist asked, "Do you write about your wife?" His answer: "Never my present wife!" Thank you for participating in this magnificent busload of comments,Barbara. Susanne

      Delete
    2. Since I am an avid reader I enjoy it.

      Delete
    3. That certainly makes sense. That's what avid is all about! Susanne Dutton

      Delete
  45. How many years have you been writing books?

    ReplyDelete
  46. I have writing stories since I was in third grade. I moved onto short stories, poems, and then longer stories, all which I was able to publish. I actually think I'm best at the long story range. In fact, this book, at 143 pages, could be considered a long story. Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable was a three year project. Susanne Dutton

    ReplyDelete
  47. Do you set an alarm so you don't write for too long at a stretch?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha ha. I don't have that problem. Given the idea that the first draft is always well, less than ideal. I say let the trash roll out. Then you can get to the review and edit phase. Thank you for your question! Susanne

      Delete
  48. What's your all time favorite book?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You'll never guess, so I'll tell you. My all time favorite book at least in the past five years is Valentin Tomberg's "Meditations on the Tarot." Sum it up? Living a worthwhile life.

      Delete
  49. Replies
    1. In the world of the Holmaniacs, I like Arthur Conan Doyle, the genius behind the thing. Actors? William Gillette, Jeremy Brett and Benedict Cumberbatch. Otherwise, I admire so many people, going so far back in history, I can't name them. I think Saint Francis of Assisi was cool, and Benjamin Franklin and Marie Louise Van Franz, an amazing investigator of the human psyche whose entire works on now being republished by Chiron. I want them all.

      Delete
  50. Do you ever get writer's block?
    If so how do you get through it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I try to figure out what makes up the block. What is the distraction that is actually more than a distraction. Maybe it has more to do with the writing than I imagine. Usually, it's a key to lead me on. If I really can't get motivated, maybe I need to write something else for awhile. It's not like I'm on a deadline for one particular story line. Thanks for your question, Barbara. Susanne Dutton

      Delete
  51. What's your favourite school memory?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I enjoyed working in the library at Homestead High School in Cupertino, CA, even the simple tasks like reshelving books, setting chairs in order and creating bulletin boards. Best of all was helping other students find whatever they needed to complete some paper. I do recall that there was a collection there entitled, "World Classics." I started with A and never finished the alphabet before I graduated, but I read more and different authors than I ever would otherwise simply because it was the next in the collection. That as a never-finished, self-assigned task, but never regretted.

      Delete
  52. Do you usually stick with one genre when writing?

    ReplyDelete
  53. Not at all. I have written and published poetry, psychology, and memoir, as well as the fiction. Thank you for your question, Barbara. Susanne Dutton

    ReplyDelete
  54. What was your best summer memory?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for participating, Jamie. I love summer at both ends and have always liked the time when seasons are changing more than the height of the season. Spring turning to summer is a welcome to warmth, the shedding of sweaters and signing up for swim lessons. Summer into Fall means the turning of leaves, the relief from from dreggy dog day heat. I was weird as a child, enjoying school and looking forward to the new school year. I recall collecting notebooks, new pens and binders and of course, new shoes, around the middle of August. My mother would scold, "Don't wish your life away. You are always looking for the next thing. Relax!" Susanne Dutton

      Delete
  55. Where do you get inspiration from to write your books?

    ReplyDelete
  56. David HollingsworthAugust 5, 2021 at 2:05 AM

    Who is your biggest champion?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I take this to mean, "who champions your work and your life, cheering you on?" I am fortunate to have a number of champions. My husband, Tom, is number one. He says,'Trust your stuff! Go for it!" I have a friend who acts as a B reader, asks respectful questions, encourages and celebrates my victories and breakthroughs as much as I do. I have to say that Propertius Press, who published "Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable," have also felt like champions, from the day I heard they wanted to bring the book to the public. I am lucky. Susanne Dutton

      Delete
  57. Replies
    1. At the end of the day, my husband and I sit on our little patio, have a drink and talk about our day. Then we have a simple supper, rarely qualifying as what most people would call "dinner." I write all afternoon now after retiring from work as a counselor, hospital chaplain and sometime mediator in the court system. He retired from working at a electrical power company, went back and earned a degree in clinical psychology and is now a psychotherapist. The secret is that we enjoy working as much as we enjoy relaxing. Thank you for your question, Deborah.

      Delete
  58. Do you ever experience writer's block?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think I experience what people call writer's block, but as an old "parson" I knew used to say, "If you can't concentrate preparing your sermon, pray the distraction." I don't pray the block, but I try to figure it out. Often it's got something to do with and contribute to the story I'm writing. Thank you, for your question, Deborah. Susanne

      Delete
  59. Is it difficult for you to think of a title and cover for your books?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Barbara. I was presented with covers from which to choose. The one I chose was based on a suggestion I made to the graphics team at Propertius Press: Time, as a theme. The title is the most honest few words I could choose to sum up the story. What is the remaining improbable in Holmes' life at the point in this story? Also, of course, it's taken from his famous dictum, "Once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, is the truth. Thank you for participating, Barbara. Susanne Dutton

      Delete
  60. How long did it take you to finish this book?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable" was begun as I sat in the lobby of a Victorian hotel, watching a beautiful old brass elevator. I'd had thoughts and ideas about the story earlier, but at that moment I happened to be holding a notebook and pen. I finished it three years later.

      Delete
  61. Around two hundred, if you count books I listen to, as well, but many are a part of the work I do for my writing. Listening to books written in the Victorian era (1832-1902) is a great way to learn the diction and voice of Victorian people. Of course, different people speak differently, but that's part of the fun and challenge. I read other books, too, of course. Everyone needs a break from 1895. I've got a cockney in the book I'm writing now. I need some cockney speaker from 1887 to edit! Thank you for your question. Susanne Dutton, author

    ReplyDelete
  62. Tell me about the best day of your life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello, Jamie. My experience has been that I figure out best days in retrospect. A should-be best day is not so great when looked at later on. A day one would not imagine could be so fine, is a day I remember as one of the best. A best day happened when I took a whitewater raft trip in Oregon while in highschool. I had never felt to close to nature and at the same time close to friends at the same time. I have just one photo of that day, but you may be sure I'll keep it. Do you know what I mean? Thank you for your question. Susanne Dutton, Author

      Delete
  63. Right now I'll say that the day I heard "Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable" was accepted for publication was pretty good. The truth is, I've had many best days. Most days are good to great. I don't expect too much to be more than satisfied. Not the lottery. Susanne Dutton, author

    ReplyDelete
  64. I love tales set in the 1800s and I enjoy being transported into the past through the pages of a book. This story sounds full of mystery and suspense! I'd love to read it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you do read it. A lot of research does go into writing a Sherlock Holmes story, and you may be sure publishers ask tough questions. I had the temerity to include a French doctor in this story. Everything is translated as it it heard by Watson, but I worried that my wording could turn out badly. Thank goodness, Propertius Press had two French speakers on staff! No complaints so far...Thank you for participating, Julie. Susanne Dutton

      Delete
  65. David HollingsworthAugust 15, 2021 at 12:22 PM

    What's your favorite character in one of your books?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right now I would have to make up my mind between Holmes and Watson. I enjoyed channelling those two as best I could, and Watson, as the storyteller of almost all Holmes stories is fun. He can't quite keep his personal opinions out of the adventures. I did write a long short story called "The Burglar of Light," published a couple years ago. The hero was a woman named Garren Wade, working for a company like Mary Kay cosmetics. She gets into real trouble when she breaks into one home and I must say, I grew to like Garren, mostly because she takes such risks and changes so much by the end of the story.

      Delete
  66. Do you ever not been able to finish a book?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sometimes I don't finish a book, especially if it's one I'm listening to over my phone. I don't choose those books as carefully and you're limited to the selection, so I make bad choices. Thank goodness, there is a return process, though it's limited. Susannne Dutton, author

      Delete
  67. Do you write more or read more?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I never stop reading. Reading is the constant occupation of my kind of writing. I take time out to write almost everyday, but I'm always reading. Even when I mow the lawn I'm listening to a book. Once I lost an ear pod thingy down a street gutter, but that doesn't stop me. Now I put on a hat to secure the pods. On the other hand, I don't listen to books when I'm with other people. That's just rude. Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  68. I would think it would be a challenge to find the right title and cover for your books.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not so for me. Every I hear a something about Holmes, outside of a Holmes context, it's his statement,"Once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, not matter how improbable, is the truth." So... that's the perfect title that leads even non-Sherlockians to Holmes. And the cover? I have a professional publisher with a wonderful graphics team who know more about good covers than I do. They gave me four choices. I chose the one that is easiest to see at a distance. Question resolved. I do appreciate your participation and your own good questions. Thank you, Barbara! Susanne, author

      Delete
  69. Where is your favorite place to escape to?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I escape to my writing desk most days. There's nothing that can't happen there, of course--and I practice my imagination there. I just finished listing to a podcast conversation between two physicists and finally realized that creativity is not limited to the arts, however. Thank you for your question. Susanne Dutton

      Delete
  70. At what age did you start writing?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Barbara. I was in fifth grade when I started keeping a spiral bound notebook between my mattress and boxspring. I still like the privacy of writing and I think it's an under-appreciated quality. Writing is a pleasurable, challenging, worthwhile activity whether or not you ever share it. Thank you. Susanne Dutton

      Delete
  71. How many years have you been writing for?

    ReplyDelete
  72. Hi Barbara. How high can you count? I've been writing since the nuns required spelling words used in sentences and I proved to be an unlikeable teacher's pet by making the sentences in a story. Thank you for your question! Susanne Dutton

    ReplyDelete
  73. David HollingsworthAugust 21, 2021 at 4:05 PM

    What's your favorite book genre?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That changes. I like mystery, of course, but poetry and true crime and big world-shaking fiction like "The Brothers Karamazov." I just received a copy of T. R. Pearson's new "Confederate States," (not a history book!, just funny as hell and beautifully written.) Thank you for participating. Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  74. Replies
    1. Even if the authors don't read every comment, "pointless comments" and comments that don't pertain to the book or about the author as well as repetitive comments get deleted and don't count towards the giveaway.

      Delete
    2. But writing "pointless comment" on different blog posts doesn't help =( I am not a fan of the daily comment entry either, but my hands are tied. I am not in charge of these giveaways. These are done by Goddess Fish Promotions. You can email them and talk to them about the daily comment entry by emailing them here: goddessfish@gmail.com

      Delete
    3. Yes, Slehan, I do read all the comments and I aim to answer all of them. If I miss one, then I apologize. I appreciate everyone who participates. Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  75. David HollingsworthAugust 23, 2021 at 8:50 PM

    What's your source of inspiration?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I practice what's called the "Morning Pages." The idea is to spend time everyday simply putting pen to paper, or fingertips to keyboard, and writing whatever comes. Very often a story or a poem grows from there. Thank you! Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  76. What author do you most like to read?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Slehan! I like so many authors, but right now I'm into a man named Valentin Tomberg, and his book "Meditations on the Tarot." It's not really about psychic card reading, not at all, but it's a book that addresses life in truly deep way. On the other hand, I like to read biographies about writers, about historical figures, and all the greats, including Mark Twain, Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope and Jane Austen. John Kennedy Toole's book, "A Confederacy of Dunces," made it to the best 100 books of the 20th Century and I loved it. Hilarious and pathetic and beautiful, all at once. Susanne Dutton

      Delete
  77. What was your favourite journey in life so far?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Jamie. I'm going to take this to mean as in "trip." Believe it or not, my sister and I road the famed California Zephyr cross country from Fremont, CA to Omaha, Nebraska when I was 11 and she was 9. Those were times when children were more free. We visited with relatives and I have many good memories. An added plus? We flew home on our own, too. How can that not be a kid's dream? Susanne Dutton

      Delete
    2. Well, the Great Valley of California, an immense agricultural area growing just about anything that can be grown, the snow topped Rocky Mountains, more trees than I could count at that time, the wild lands of the lands to the east of the rockies, full of small towns very unlike the suburbs we lived in, the deserts of Utah, the incredible mountain scenery of Colorado and the corn and wheat fields of Nebraska. For a child convinced that California was about the whole deal, I was shocked. Then my sister lost her coin purse and I had to share all my snacks. Oh well.

      Delete
  78. What is your favorite book you ever wrote?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm always most in love with the book I'm writing, which would be the next Holmes book. It's hard to keep up the mojo if you aren't infatuated with the story you're exploring every day--and that is certainly what it is: exploration. The story is there; I'm finding it. Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  79. When do you start your next book?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh! I'm well into the next book, at least 40K words. The way to remain sane as a writer is to keep writing. If I'd stopped writing while I looked for a publisher and during the publisher's process of readiness for the publication date, I'd go crazy. By the way, that preparation process was a year and a half. Even short stories actually come out quite a while after acceptance, perhaps six months. Publishers work well ahead.

      Delete
  80. How many pages do you try to write each day?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some days I get six to ten, some days I get caught up in an inspiration for a new aspect of the story or a character's life or personality. That means research. An example would be a character in the book I'm writing now who is fourteen. The information she adds to Holmes' understanding of the mystery is critical and that information required research in a world's fair--and also a strange jump rope rhyme. Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  81. Any tips for healing my broken heart?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sorry to hear you're hurting. I believe that each broken heart is singular. You are singular. The way you might heal is your own. Some people can just let time pass, or look for someone else, but if you want to your own way, find someone to talk to about that way. I wish you the best.

      Delete
  82. Replies
    1. Thanks, Nancy. It's definitely a classic Holmes you meet in my story. He is faced with several mysteries, some more worrisome than he's used to facing. At the same time a very big, old challenge looms and Watson finds himself facing an unnerving situation, too. Susanne Dutton, Author

      Delete
  83. Did you always want to be a writer?
    Or did you consider other occupations?

    ReplyDelete
  84. Hello Barbara. You may be sure that all but a small percentage of writers do other things as well. Writing is something I did long before I thought I could publish anything, before I even considered or knew much about publishing. I kept a notebook between my mattress and boxspring for my writing and never showed it to anyone for a long time. It's much like loving to run or sing. I found myself doing it because writing is so satisfying. For me, also, it went along with loving to read. I was a counselor, hospital chaplain, and a court mediator in my professional life. Thank for your good question. Susanne Dutton, author

    ReplyDelete
  85. Did I tell you my twin sister has almost the same name as you? She spells her name Suzanne.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I often wish I were a more simple "Suzanne." In the digital age, I am always saying, "Susanne, with an 's' rather than a 'z.' Otherwise, I don't come up on the lists. Oh well, I was named after a great grandmother and also my mother's sister who died when she was just 15. I wonder who the great grandmother was named after? Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  86. David HollingsworthAugust 30, 2021 at 4:12 PM

    What do you enjoy about Sherlock Holmes?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello David. I guess I enjoy reading about the late 19th C, for one. It was a self-congratulatory time and place, much like our own. I'd just as soon live now, however. I like voting and antibiotics. I also think the relationship between Holmes and Watson is engaging and perhaps the secret to the stories' popularity. Conan Doyle did write a couple stories narrated by Sherlock on his own, but compared to the rest, they flopped. Conan Doyle's work has a lot going for it. I understand that puzzle-solving itself is a good dopamine hit for us mere humans. Thanks for your comment. Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  87. This book sounds very interesting-a definate read for me

    ReplyDelete
  88. Thank you, satkins! If you are an ebook reader, "Sherlock Holmes and the Remaining Improbable," is now on $4.99 at the Propertius Press link, above. Of course there is a nice, not-too-heavy paperback, too. Susanne M. Dutton, author

    ReplyDelete
  89. Have you ever won a contest or sweepstakes?

    ReplyDelete
  90. Hi Jamie. No. I won a book, signed by the author, at a talk by that author. It's the only thing I've won, except put-down-your-dime and spin the wheel at carnivals. Strangely enough, the other win was a book about Arthur Conan Doyle and his character, Sherlock Holmes. Non-fiction and excellent. Susanne Dutton, author

    ReplyDelete
  91. Replies
    1. Hi clc. Thanks. I like it too. Easy to see across a bookstore, no? Thanks for commenting. Susanne Dutton, P.S. Short and sweet. We're experiencing a tornado and I'm a bit hyper!

      Delete
  92. Hi Jamie. Thank you for your question. I usually feel "lost" when I've lost something: a person, a place, I will miss. I try to recognize that and mourn the loss for what it is, maybe treating myself as if I were a friend who had lost something important. Eventually, I watch for what comes to take that place in my heart, knowing that it will never take the place fully. I guess that's life. Susanne Dutton, author

    ReplyDelete
  93. Where has been your favorite place to travel to?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Slehan. Rome wins, hands down. Most intriguing. Most amazing. Italians take time for beauty, not just practicality. In fact, if there's choice, beautiful or practical, beauty wins. I also found a lot of sanity in the culture. Thank you for your question. Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  94. david hollingsworthSeptember 3, 2021 at 1:20 PM

    What do you like about writing mystery stories? Is it the characters, or the anticipation of something going to happen?

    ReplyDelete
  95. Do you prefer ebooks or solid books?

    ReplyDelete
  96. David HollingsworthSeptember 4, 2021 at 7:07 PM

    How many books have you were written?

    ReplyDelete
  97. Do you do a lot of people watching?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good question, slehan! I am an observer, definitely. How else do you learn how people behave, whether by themselves waiting in a line, or in a group, walking down the street? Writers need to be observers. Thank you for participating. Susanne M. Dutton

      Delete
  98. Have you always wanted to be a writer?

    ReplyDelete
  99. David HollingsworthSeptember 5, 2021 at 2:55 PM

    Do you have emotional reactions while you're writing books?

    ReplyDelete
  100. David HollingsworthSeptember 6, 2021 at 3:28 PM

    Do you any ideas for your next book?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha! Are you kidding? I'm half way done with the next book, another Holmes story, but set a different time. Thank you for commenting, David, Susanne Dutton, author

      Delete
  101. Is there anything weighing on your mind?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Jamie. The people of Afghanistan and all those who are suffering there. It's so sad and that "weighs" tons, let's face it. The other thing, in my own little world, is the fact that I'm picking up my grandson from daycare and I'm going to take him to a park with those "bucket swings" for babies. Susanne M. Dutton, author

      Delete
  102. Do you take holidays as time off from writing?

    ReplyDelete
  103. Have you ever been to a Twitter party?

    ReplyDelete