Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Virtual Book Tour and Giveaway: A Million Things to Ask a Neuroscientist by Mike Tranter, PhD

Welcome to my stop on the virtual book tour for A Million Things to Ask a Neuroscientist by Mike Tranter, PhD. This book tour was organized by Goddess Fish Promotions. On my stop, I have an excerpt from the book as well as a great guest post from the author. There’s also the chance to win a $20 Amazon or Barnes & Noble gift card in the our wide giveaway. Be sure to visit the other stops on the tour for more content. Enjoy!
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Title: A Million Things to Ask a Neuroscientist
Author: Mike Tranter, PhD
Publisher: Queen of the World Publishing
Publication Date: March 11th 2021
Print Length: 250 pages
Genre: Non-Fiction Popular Science
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A Million Things To Ask A Neuroscientist answers some of the most asked questions about the brain, making the science fun and accessible to everyone. Inside, you will journey through some of the most interesting and strange things that our brain does every single day.

Have you always wanted to know just what a memory actually is, or why we dream? What is our consciousness? Why do some people seem to ‘click’ with others? And can our brain really multi-task?

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EXCERPT:
Have you ever been standing at the top of a tall building or cliff edge and had a sudden but brief urge to jump? You have no real thought of actually doing it, and you are not depressed, suicidal, or otherwise distressed, but that urge appears nonetheless. As it turns out, neuroscience has a name for such an occurrence, high places phenomenon, sometimes termed the call to the void, and it is actually very normal and common. There are also reports of impulses to jump in front of a train, stick a hand in a fire, or turn a steering wheel into traffic. Thankfully, the person generally doesn't follow through, and although most accounts of this phenomenon are anecdotal, there is one team of scientists in Florida, USA, who decided to take another look. The research team asked 431 students about such episodes in their personal lives, and a surprising 55% acknowledged that they have experienced them at some stage in their lives.

Science has revealed to us that high place phenomenon is possibly the result of a split-second delay between two opposing brain signals. One signal is based on our survival instinct that notices danger and tells us that we should avoid it, such as falling from a great height, or a train hitting us in the face. Another signal coming from our more logical brain tells us that we are relatively safe where we are, and there is no real threat to our survival. The resulting signals are interpreted by our brain - now somewhat confused, for it to relay this rather bizarre message and we experience the high place phenomenon. So, if you ever have a sudden impulse to jump off the top of Mount Everest, just remember that it is normal, but please don't do it anyway.
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Dr Mike Tranter is from the North of England and studied how drugs work in our body, but it wasn't long before he found his true calling as a neuroscientist. After a PhD in neuroscience, he spent years in research labs all over the world, studying how the brain works. Although, it is his prominent rise as a science communicator, opening up the world of neuroscience to everybody, that he enjoys the most.

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GUEST POST:
- What is your favorite little tidbit about the brain?

My favourite thing about the brain is that you can always learn more, and always improve yourself. It is never too late. It is a highly complex processing machine, that does millions, or billions of things without you ever knowing it, but it is very adaptable.

In fact, within an area of the memory region, scientists have seen new brain cells growing every day. Around 700! Typically, when we learn more, and test our brain, it is forced to make new connections. Brain cells will reach out to other cells and ‘talk’ to each other. It is amazing that we also grow cells throughout our life. For a long time, scientists believed that once the brain was formed, it never really grew more cells. But it does!

The best way to keep this process happening to keep learning, and to keep challenging yourself. People who can speak more than one language are very good at this. Their brains show a lot of improvement from the extra work they put in, and we can even see this in brain scans.

So what is your limit? When is it best to learn? The feeling that children learn the best, and adults struggle to improve in the same way is not true. Science has shown this. In fact, brain cells never stop growing. The oldest person to have shown this was a 97-year-old woman. 97!!!

It doesn’t matter where your brain is now, or where you think your brain is, it is always looking to improve and learn. You can always get that little bit better, and that 97 year old lady proved it.
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GIVEAWAY:
Michael Tranter, PhD will be awarding a $20 Amazon or Barnes & Noble gift card to a randomly drawn winner via Rafflecopter. To increase your chance of winning, leave a comment at a different stop on the tour each day.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

69 comments:

  1. Looks like an interesting book.
    Thanks for the contest. 

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    Replies
    1. Thank you. I tried to make it as varied and interesting as possible. Hope you enjoy. Good luck on the contest. Mike.

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  2. Thank you for hosting my book today. Happy to answer any comments and questions. Mike.

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  3. Although it was published on March 11 and is already number 1 on amazon ๐Ÿ˜Š

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    1. Oops, I will fix that! I was looking at the Kindle version of the book which is on pre-order. =)

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  4. Do you ever suffer from writer’s block and, if so, how do you overcome it?

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    1. I tend to be ok but I prepare a lot. I make lists, bullet points, and scribble down notes whenever I think of something random. Even if i wont use it for months. That way there is always something to help me start writing. Are you writing something at the moment? Mike

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  5. Replies
    1. Thank you Wendy. I also think it is awesome ๐Ÿ™‚. Mike

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  6. Sounds like an informative book.

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    1. Thanks Susan. There is a lot crammed into this book, and so far people seem to be really enjoying it. Thank you for reading about my book. Mike.

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  7. David HollingsworthMarch 31, 2021 at 3:41 PM

    Sounds like a very interesting book.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks David. Glad you like it, do you read science books already, or will this be a new subject for you? Mike.

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    2. David HollingsworthApril 2, 2021 at 3:46 PM

      I think a new genre for me.

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  8. This book sound so interesting.

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  9. It sounds like an interesting book. Thank you for sharing.

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  10. How long was the writing process?

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    1. Hi Deborah. In total, about 6 months. But that was working everyday. I think I took only one day off in that time. But I enjoyed it so much it never felt too intense.

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  11. May you achieve all of your dreams.

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    1. Thank you Thomas. I really appreciate that. I hope you do too ๐Ÿ™‚

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  12. This sounds like a book that would be a fascinating and educational read.

    Nancy
    allibrary (at) aol (dot) com

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    1. Thank you Nancy. I hope so yes, I wanted to aim it at everyone from highschool all the way up. So there is a little in it for everyone, especially to inspire the younger generation of future scientists

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  13. This is so interesting. Looking forward to reading and finding out so many answers to questions I have about the brain functions

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    1. Thank you Katie. That's so great. There is an email address in the book too, where people can ask about anything they read in the book. I always reply. Have a nice day.

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  14. sounds like a fun one

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    1. Thanks Daniel. Thank you for reading through the post. Hope you enjoy the book. Have a nice day. Mike.

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  15. Replies
    1. Thank you Calvin. I made the book as interesting as I could, so there should be something inside for everyone which surprises them. Mike.

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  16. I enjoyed the excerpt. Thank you for the giveaway.

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    1. Thank you Debbi. I'm really happy you enjoyed it. Mike.

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  17. Replies
    1. Thanks Leela. I think so too ��.
      Thank you for stopping by and reading about my book.
      Mike

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    2. �� = : )

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  18. nice book cover and the book sounds interesting.

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  19. Thank you. Yeah I made an online poll for the cover and that one came out on top. Happy you like the book. Mike.

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  20. Replies
    1. Thanks Dale. I also think so. Thanks for reading about my book. Hope you have a nice weekend. mike

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  21. Replies
    1. I will do something everyday yes. That could be research, writing, the illustrations, but most of writing a book is editing and redrafting. So i spent most of the time doing that. But I found that working on the book everyday was best. Thanks for your question. Mike

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  22. Thank you for the excerpt.. This book looks so interesting and in easy to understand language..a must buy...

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    1. Thanks Michele. Happy you like the excerpt. I spent a lot of time making sure I wrote it in a way that people would enjoy, rather than be put off by, and I'm really happy you like it. Have a nice weekend.Mike

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  23. Replies
    1. I second that, good luck, and have a nice weekend. Mike.

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  24. My son is taking a neuroscience class in college
    He loves it ! Psychology is his major natbelinsky@verizon.net

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    1. That's great. If he is lucky enough to find something that he has a passion for, then that is really amazing. I wish him the best of luck. There is an email address at the back of the book, if he ever needs any advice etc, he can always send me a message. Mike

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  25. My son is taking a neuroscience class in college
    He loves it ! Psychology is his major natbelinsky@verizon.net

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  26. My son is taking a neuroscience class in college
    He loves it ! Psychology is his major natbelinsky@verizon.net

    ReplyDelete
  27. My son is taking a neuroscience class in college
    He loves it ! Psychology is his major natbelinsky@verizon.net

    ReplyDelete
  28. Replies
    1. I second that Deborah. Have a great weekend. Mike.

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  29. wow this looks like great information to have!

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    1. Thanks Molli. The questions I answer in the book were all submitted by non-scientists, which, I hope, makes it really interesting and varied. Have a nice weekend. Mike.

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  30. How do you come up with ideas for your writing?

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    1. Hi Barbara. I tend to randomly think up ideas all the time, but they are mostly for future books. For this one, I used social media to invite people to talk ask questions which helped. For the rest of the book, the future of neuroscience for example, I just kept finding more and more exciting things as I went further into that rabbit hole, so the ideas somehow found there way to me. I'm open to all possibilities when writing, which helps the ideas flow. Have a nice weekend. Mike

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  31. This sounds like an interesting book. Thank you for sharing.

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    1. Thanks Susan. Thank you for taking the time to read through the post about my book. Have a great weekend. Mike.

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